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Berlin Jewish district and arts tour

Berlin’s former Jewish district is famous for its courtyards and galleries, and this intriguing and emotional tour will help you discover places full of charm and steeped in history that no visitor should miss. HIGHLIGHTS:

* Step through the moments of history that defined the Jewish community’s fate in Berlin

* Visit memorials and locations that bring history to life

* See the Gallery Mile and other contemporary art projects

Come along and explore an area that despite its tragic past is today is brimming with vitality thanks to a vibrant arts scene. There has been a Jewish community in Berlin ever since the city began to be settled in the late 12th century. In the coming centuries, like most Berliners, they thrived or suffered, facing occasional bouts of persecution but they had to wait until 1812 to be allowed to practise any profession that they wished to. By the time the Nazis came to power in 1933, there were 160,000 Jews in the city – 12 years later, following Germany’s defeat in the war, barely 1,200 remained. This tour will touch on themes such as Kristallnacht, the notorious Night of Broken Glass, the Wannsee Conference that put in motion the Nazis’ ‘final solution’ and the remarkable Rosenstrasse protest by the non-Jewish wives of Jewish men that saved their husbands’ lives. Visit memorials and locations associated with the Jewish community in the Spandauer Vorstadt, and learn about its tragic history and how it has been regenerated by the development of concepts such as the ‘Gallery Mile’ of Auguststrasse after the fall of the Berlin Wall. The adjacent Scheunenviertel area was where the poor Jewish immigrants from Central and Eastern Europe lived in slum conditions. Come along and explore an area that despite its tragic past is today is brimming with vitality thanks to a vibrant arts scene. There has been a Jewish community in Berlin ever since the city began to be settled in the late 12th century. In the coming centuries, like most Berliners, they thrived or suffered, facing occasional bouts of persecution but they had to wait until 1812 to be allowed to practise any profession that they wished to. Duration: Three hours. Start/opening time: Wednesdays and Saturdays at 4.30pm. Languages: Spanish.